Eat Your Way Round the World: Snacking Peruvian Style

Peruvian children snack on some delicious variations of our snack foods, but with a style that goes back thousands of years.

The authentic smells and tastes of Peru are surprisingly enticing to kids, especially their snack foods. While Peruvians enjoy lavish sit down meals, they are also a very travel oriented people, hence that mobile food. Check out these Peruvian delicacies that might sound a little familiar.

Maiz Cusco. So adults, remember Corn Nuts from when you were a kid? Have a guess where that came from? Right. Incans grew a varietal of corn that boasts big juicy kernels, a crop that spread throughout South and Central America. It can can be ground into Masa for Tamales, or, in the case of Maisz Cusco, lightly fried, cooled and salted into a crunchy nibble. Any Latin import store will have this corn either canned or dry, which can be soaked and then fried in a little veggie oil.

Chips Andenas. The potato actually originated in Peru, and migrated slowly upwards. This is why their potatoes have such a rainbow of variety, from little purple and blue ones to bright orange and yellow fat boys. So you can imagine the way their potato chips taste. Some of them even have swirls of color inside. http://www.limaeasy.com/peruvian-food-guide/typical-snacks/chips-andinas-chifles-nativas

Piqueos. This is a traditional platter of pre-dinner snacks, hot or cold, that Peruvians serve as appetizers. Dried Banana, spiced garbanzos, and chunks of pineapple with a little cumin can get the juices flowing. http://perudelights.com/peruvian-piqueos-the-art-of-shared-nibbling/

Want to hear a little Peruvian music while you make your snacks? Smithsonian Folkways has some beautiful, traditional music right on their page, click here: http://www.festival.si.edu/2015/peru/music-of-peru/smithsonian

Peru is a truly remarkable, colorful place and all those colors come into play in the kitchen. Expand the horizons for your little travelers by showing them the diversity of flavors and customs in this very big world.

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